Hobbs_Family_California

The Hobbs Family as early settlers of California. Nancy Kelsey the First American Woman in California 1841, Sarah Jane Hobbs Lewis Stubblefield came on a 1853 Wagon train. Mahala Gann came with her parents in 1847 on the Hopper Wagon train. In 1846, John Wheeler Green, abt. four years old, the family crossed the plains as members of the ill-fated Donner Party, but left that group in, joining the Wheeler/Harlan Wagon train, thus escaping the fate which befell the Donner’s. From Olive C. Hobbs

Friday, August 14, 2009

HOBBS COAT OF ARMS



THE HOBBS COAT OF ARMS HEREBY ILLUSTRATED IS OFFICIALLY DOCUMENTED IN BURKE'S GENERAL ARMORY.
THE ORIGINAL DESCRIPTION OF THE ARMS (SHIELD) IS AS FOLLOWS:
"GU. A CHEV. ENGR. BETWN. THREE FISHES NAIANT AR. ON A CHIEF OF THE SECOND AS MANY HERONS SA. MEMBERED AND BEAKED OF THE FIRST."

When translated the blazon also describes the original colors of the HOBBS ARMS as:
"Red; a Silver Engraviled Chevron, between Three Silver Fish Swimming; on a Silver upper third, Three Black Herons with Red Beaks and Legs."
Above the Shield and Helmet is the Crest which is described as:
"A Black Half Heron Flying, holding in the Red Beak a Silver Fish."


Researchers Note: From Lowell Jean Hobbs
The following is from the book "Hobbs and Related Families, Vol 2", Page 2.

According to Burke's General Armory, there were a total of six coats of armour issued to the Hobbs. Two were identical, so there are five that have different designs. They were issued in the following English Counties; Middlesex, Stoke Gursy, County Somerset, West Wickham, County Buckingham, Weybridge, County Surry; one in Tooting County, Surry and another of the same design in Quedgeley County, Gloucester.

A coat of arms was issued to a particular person. No one else was allowed to use the coat of arms except the person to whom it was issued, plus those who owed him their allegiance and who fought on his side. It may be that the two that were issued in the same design in Tooting County, Surry, and in Quedgeley County, Glouchester were issued to a man and his son or to a kinsman.

There is no explanation why the Coat of Arms for the Hobbs in County Middlesex is the most popular. It certainly isn't because it is the most regal.

There is no motto included with either Coat of Arms, however we have seen the motto "Always Ready" used by some. There is no authority for it's use.

Americans seem to enjoy displaying a Coat of Arms as if it were their very own, having been handed down from generation to generation by their direct ancestor. If there are any Hobbs today who can trace their ancestry directly to an ancestor to whom a Coat of Arms was issued, they are in an extreme minority. We have not seen one yet. Even then, they can not claim it as their own, but only that it was issued to their ancestor.

If you wish to display a Hobbs Coat of Arms, feel free to pick either of the five you have a preference for, however we strongly suggest you seriously consider the one from County Middlesex simply because it is the one most commonly used, and the one most widely recognized.

The art work on the Hobbs shields doesn't seem as fierce as on some Coats of Arms. They contain fishes, herons, a three legged trivet, falcons, eagles, and lions.

Hope this is what you are looking for. Jean Hobbs

1 Comments:

Blogger A rootdigger said...

How about a town or village coat of arms. say a region larger than a village. those coat of arms are nice to see.

April 6, 2011 at 7:32 PM  

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